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Nat Sherman Banner Image​​​​​​​​
​A super-premium cigarette and cigar business founded in New York City in 1930.
​About Nat Sherman
For more than three generations, the Nat Sherman family has provided luxury cigarettes and cigars to our adult consumers.​
​About Nat Sherman
For more than three generations, the Nat Sherman family has provided luxury cigarettes and cigars to our adult consumers.​
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​About Nat Sherman
​From our humble beginnings in 1930 in the heart of New York City’s garment district, Nat Sherman has become one of the most recognized and sought-after brands for adult tobacco consumers.​
Our super-premium cigarettes, including Classic, MCD and Originals, are crafted in Greensboro, N.C. Our premium cigars, including Timeless, Metropolitan and Epoca, are available nationwide and at our flagship store, known as the Townhouse in Manhattan.​ This legendary shop provides a uniquely timeless and memorable tobacconist experience.​
Still a small organization with a family feel, all of our employees are personally invested in offering the highest quality products. We take pride in providing excellent service to our customers and responsibly marketing our products to adult tobacco consumers. To learn more visit Our Mission and Values​ that guide how we operate.​ If you are interested in learning more about Nat Sherman careers, visit our careers website​.
Nat Sherman became part of the Altria family of companies in 2017.​
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​Our Leadership
Dominik Meier
Managing Director
General Manager​
Dominik Meier Picture
​Our Leadership
Dominik Meier
Managing Director
General Manager​
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Our Leadership
Dominik Meier PictureDominik Meier
Managing Director​
General Manager​
​Dominik Meier is the Managing Director and General Manager of Nat Sherman LLC, a super-premium cigarette and cigar business.​
Before assuming his current role, Dominik served as Managing Director, Consumer Insights & Engagement supporting Philip Morris USA, John Middleton, and Nat Sherman. Prior to that, Dominik served as General Manager for a joint venture, Richmark GmbH. He has also worked in Strategy & Business Development and Brand Management, supporting Marlboro.​
Dominik is a Swiss and Italian citizen and has a BA from Tufts University and an MA from the University of Chicago. He is actively involved with organizations that support the environment or enable individuals with physical, intellectual and developmental disabilities. He has previously served on the Keep Virginia Beautiful Board and is currently involved with Inclusive Racing​.
Brendon Scott
Chief Financial Officer
Nathan Justice
Manufacturing
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Our Facilities​
Our headquarters is located in Englewood, NJ and our cigarette manufacturing facility is in Greensboro, NC.
Our Facilities​
Our headquarters is located in Englewood, NJ and our cigarette manufacturing facility is in Greensboro, NC.
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Our Facilities


​Nat Sherman Headquarters​
Our headquarters is in Englewood, NJ, just outside of New York City.


​Greensboro Manufacturing Facility​​
We began manufacturing our cigarette products in our Greensboro, NC facility in 2000. This 42,000 square foot facility has about 32 employees.​


The Townhouse Retail Location​​
​Our flagship store is located on 42nd Street just off of Fifth Avenue in New York City. This legendary shop provides a uniquely timeless and memorable experience and for New Yorkers is a quintessential local landmark.​​
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Cigarette Smoking & Health Image
Smoking & Health​
Cigarette​s
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Cigarette Smoking & Health
​​There is no safe cigarette. Cigarettes are addictive and cause serious diseases in smokers. For those concerned about the health risks of smoking, the best thing to do is quit.​
Research ImageNat Sherman agrees with the overwhelming medical and scientific consensus that cigarette smoking causes lung cancer, heart disease, emphysema and other serious diseases in smokers. Smokers are far more likely to develop such serious diseases than non-smokers.​
These have been, and continue to be, the messages of the U.S. Surgeon General and public health authorities worldwide. Smokers and potential smokers should be guided by these messages when deciding whether or not to smoke.​
You can obtain more information directly from these public health organizations about cigarette smoking and disease in smokers: International Agency for Research on Cancer, the World Health Organization, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the American Cancer Society, and the U.S. Surgeon General​.​
Our Support of a Consistent Public Health Message​
We support a single, consistent public health message on the role of cigarette smoking in the development of disease in smokers, and on smoking and addiction.​
Surgeon General Reports on Smoking & Health
The Surgeon General of the United States has been the nation's leading spokesperson on matters of public health since 1871.​
Beginning in 1962, at the request of President John F. Kennedy, the Surgeon General's office took on the task of reviewing literature on smoking and health and began issuing periodic reports. The first report was published in 1964.​
For more information on the Surgeon General Reports related to tobacco use, please visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)​.​
To access all Surgeon General Reports, please visit the National Library of Medicine​ website and click on the full list of reports link.​​
Quitting Smoking​​
1-800-QUITNOW is a national quitline number that connects smokers wishing to quit with free information and professional help. This number allows callers to access the National Network of Tobacco Cessation​ quitlines, which will link a caller to a state-run quitline, if one exists. Should a state not have a quitline, callers are routed to the National Cancer Institute quitline.​
​Cigarette Smoking & Pregnancy​
Women who quit cigarette smoking before or during pregnancy reduce the risk of adverse reproductive outcomes.​
Women who smoke cigarettes have more difficulty becoming pregnant and have a higher risk of never becoming pregnant. Smoking during pregnancy increases the risks for pregnancy complications, premature birth, spontaneous abortion and stillbirth.​
Babies of mothers who smoked cigarettes during pregnancy on average have lower birth weights. Low birth weight babies are at greater risk for childhood and adult illnesses and even death. Women who quit cigarette smoking before the third trimester (the last three months) of pregnancy are more likely to have babies who are close to normal weight.​
Smoking by pregnant women can cause sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). According to the 2004 U.S. Surgeon General’s Report​, infants whose mothers smoked before and after birth are at three to four times greater risk for SIDS, and babies exposed to secondhand smoke after birth are at twice the risk.​
When mothers smoke cigarettes during pregnancy, it hurts their babies’ lungs. Infants of mothers who smoked cigarettes during pregnancy have reduced lung function and may have increased frequency of lower respiratory tract illness. They may also have increased risk for impaired lung function in childhood and adulthood. For pregnant women, cigarette smoking could also put their babies at increased risk of asthma and respiratory infections.​
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​Secondhand Cigarette Smoke​
Secondhand smoke, also known as environmental tobacco smoke or ETS, is a combination of the smoke coming from the lit end of a cigarette and the smoke exhaled by a person smoking.​
​Public health officials have concluded that secondhand smoke from cigarettes causes disease, including lung cancer and heart disease, in non-smoking adults, as well as causes conditions in children such as asthma, respiratory infections, cough, wheeze, otitis media (middle ear infection) and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. In addition, public health officials have concluded that secondhand smoke can exacerbate adult asthma and cause eye, throat and nasal irritation.​
The public should be guided by the conclusions of public health officials regarding the health effects of secondhand smoke when deciding whether to be in places where secondhand smoke is present, or if they are smokers, when and where to smoke around others. Particular care should be exercised where children are concerned and adults should avoid smoking cigarettes around them.​
The conclusions of public health officials concerning environmental tobacco smoke are sufficient to warrant measures that regulate cigarette smoking in public places​. In places where cigarette smoking is permitted, the government should require the posting of warning notices that communicate public health officials' conclusions that secondhand smoke causes disease in non-smokers.​
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Cigar and Pipe Tobacco​
Smoking & Health​
Cigar and Pipe Tobacco​
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Cigar Smoking & Health
​Cigar smoking is addictive and causes serious diseases. Cigar smoking is not a safe alternative to cigarette smoking.
​These have been, and continue to be, the messages of the U.S. Surgeon General and public health authorities worldwide. Current cigar smokers and potential cigar smokers should be guided by these messages when deciding whether or not to smoke cigars.
Research Image
​In this section of our website you will find information on these cigar-related messages, as well as links to government and public health authorities, including the U.S. Surgeon General's reports related to tobacco. Click on the links at the right to obtain more information about cigar smoking and health.​
​​​​Cigar Smoking & Disease​
​Cigar smoking causes serious disease. The U.S. Surgeon General and other public health authorities have determined that:​​
  • Cigar smoking causes cancers of the mouth and throat, even if you do not inhale.
  • Cigar smoking causes lung cancer and heart disease.
  • Tobacco use increases the risk of infertility, stillbirth and low birth weight.
  • Cigar smoking is not a safe alternative to cigarette smoking.
  • Tobacco smoke increases the risk of lung cancer and heart disease, even in nonsmokers.​
Current cigar smokers and potential cigar smokers should be guided by these messages when deciding whether or not to smoke cigars.
​Addiction
The U.S. Surgeon General and other public health authorities have determined that cigar and pipe smoking are addictive. It can be very difficult to quit smoking, but this should not deter smokers who want to quit from trying to do so.​
Cigar & Pipe Tobacco ​Related Resources​:

Read the Surgeon General Reports:​​​
​Quitting​
According to the National Cancer Institute, "to those currently smoking cigars, quitting is the only way to eliminate the documented harm that can result from cigar smoking."
For cigar smokers who have decided to quit, a wealth of expert quitting information exists from public health authorities and others. For example:​
  • www.smokefree.gov is a website from the National Cancer Institute which provides free information and professional help to people trying to quit using tobacco.
  • 1-800-QUIT-NOW (1-800-784-8669) is a toll-free telephone number which connects callers to their state-run quitline for counseling and information about quitting tobacco.​

Surgeon General & Public Health Reports​
The Surgeon General of the United States has been the nation's leading spokesperson on matters of public health since 1871. Beginning in 1962, at the request of President John F. Kennedy, the Surgeon General's Office took on the task of reviewing literature on smoking and health, including cigar smoking, and began issuing periodic reports. The first report was published in 1964.​
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​Pipe Tobacco​
Pipe smoking is addictive and causes serious diseases. Pipe smoking is not a safe alternative to cigarette smoking.​
These have been, and continue to be, the messages of the U.S. Surgeon General and public health authorities worldwide. Current pipe smokers and potential pipe smokers should be guided by these messages when deciding whether or not to smoke pipes.​
In this section of our website you will find information on these pipe-related messages, as well as links to government and public health authorities, including the U.S. Surgeon General's reports related to tobacco. Click on the Related Resources links above to obtain more information about pipe smoking and health.
​​Smoking & Disease in Pipe Smokers​
Pipe smoking causes serious diseases. The U.S. Surgeon General and other public health authorities have determined that:
  • Pipe smoking causes cancers of the mouth and throat, even if you do not inhale.
  • Pipe smoking causes lung cancer and heart disease.
  • Tobacco use increases the risk of infertility, stillbirth, and low birth weight.
  • Pipes are not a safe alternative to cigarettes.
  • Tobacco smoke increases the risk of lung cancer and heart disease, even in nonsmokers.
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Current pipe smokers and potential pipe smokers should be guided by these messages when deciding whether or not to smoke pipes. ​
​​Quitting the Use of Pipe Tobacco​
1-800-QUITNOW is a national quitline number that connects smokers wishing to quit with free information and professional help. This number allows callers to access the National Network of Tobacco Cessation quitlines, which will link a caller to a state-run quitline, if one exists. Should a state not have a quitline, callers are routed to the National Cancer Institute quitline.​
​Surgeon General & Public Health Reports​
The Surgeon General of the United States has been the nation's leading spokesperson on matters of public health since 1871. Beginning in 1962, at the request of President John F. Kennedy, the Surgeon General's Office took on the task of reviewing literature on smoking and health, including cigar smoking, and began issuing periodic reports. The first report was published in 1964.​
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